Another program, VSDC Video Editor Pro, simply has too outdated an interface, making common tasks difficult. Longtime pro video editors will note the absence of Avid Media Composer, which is simply too unwieldy for PCMag's primarily consumer audience. There are a couple of more interesting applications—NCH VideoPad and AVS Video Editor among them—that we simply haven't tested yet.

To help, you'll need to investigate different VPN offerings for those remote connections, and potentially work with your IT professional to implement quality of service (QoS) on your network that'll protect the bandwidth used by video conferences while they're happening. If you're already using a cloud PBX-based voice over IP (VoIP) system for your phone calls, your IT people will already have a good idea how to protect traffic this way as the requirements are very similiar.
Instead of spending half your life in airport lines, bring life to your meetings by using a video conferencing service. This way, the presenter is not just a voice on the phone but an on-screen presence who is able to see and interact with other attendees, share presentations, and more. For collaborative meetings, the host can sketch out ideas on an online whiteboard and invite participants to join in. Some video conferencing services let presenters pass control to another participant who can continue the meeting without interruption. Others let hosts deny access to latecomers to further avoid disruption.

8 New State-of-The-Art Video App


Quik is from a newer generation of video editor apps. It's halfway decent if you need something simple. The way it works is you add up to 50 photos and video clips into the app. The app then analyzes them and spits out a short video from them. Quik contains about two dozen video styles and you can re-order and customize your video before you export it. It’s not nearly as powerful as something like Adobe Premiere Clip or PowerDirector, but not everyone needs something that intense. It's free to download with no in-app purchases.
When it comes to video editing on iPhone, no other app comes even close to the feature set that is packed inside LumaFusion. It is the only outright paid app on this list and it deserve every cent. The app is not only used by YouTubers but even mobile journalists and professional video producers who don’t want to carry heavy camera gear and editing rig where they go.
Infuse three bridges the gap between iTunes and your other content. The user interface of the app is more eye-catching compared to other video players. Like all others, Infuse three supports almost all kind of video formats. You’ll not need to convert your favorite movie to a different format to watch it on your iPad. The app is free, but you can upgrade to pro version to get additional features.
Funimate is one of the surprisingly popular, but not overly powerful video editor apps. It bills itself as being a great app for making music videos or simple videos out of the stuff you already have on your device. There are 15 video filters that you can play with and the creation process is fairly painless. This isn’t something you’d want to use on a serious video. It has things like video effects. However, it's better for short little social media posts rather than actual video production. You can download it for free to try it out yourself.
Aside from shared meetings, video conferencing is also an efficient way of getting other business tasks done, whether that means addressing customers' support questions live, interacting with customers in real time webinars or other marketing events, and even reacing out to partners. Transparency Market Research forecasts the global video conferencing market to be worth $8,958.7 million by 2025 and grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 8.3 percent between 2017 and 2025.
Google Duo is essentially Google's answer to FaceTime. It's also one of the most simple video chat apps available. You simply log in, verify your number, and you're good to go. You can video call other Google Duo users like you're making a normal phone call. It also includes a feature called Knock Knock that lets you see what someone is up to before you answer the video call. The app is cross-platform. That means it works between iOS and Android. Rumor is that a web version is coming for computer support eventually. This is about as easy as it gets for video calling apps. It's really very good.

paul ponnaiya md

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