Nothing makes an impression like moving pictures with sound. That's why digital video continues to grow in importance online. Couple that trend with the ever-increasing availability of devices capable of high-resolution video recording—phones, GoPros, DSLRs—and the case for ever-more powerful video editing software becomes clear. Further, the software must be usable by nonprofessionals, and it has to keep up with newer formats such as HEVC (High Efficiency Video Coding) and 360-degree VR video, and it has to be able to handle 4K and higher resolution.
Increasingly, new capabilities trickle down from professional-level software to the consumer category. That's a good thing for nonprofessional movie editors, since the more consumer-oriented software tends to make easier procedures that can sometimes be pretty tricky in the pro-level software. Read on for a survey of the latest trends in video editing software along with our top picks in the field.

There are plenty of business level video chat apps out there. They function differently from consumer level stuff. For instance, there is a larger emphasis on file sharing, attendance taking, and conferencing tools compared to something like Skype, WhatsApp, or Google Duo. Google Hangouts is slowly making its way to this genre. Some other good options include Zoom, Cisco Webex Meetings, GoToMeeting, and some others. The prices vary, but the software generally works okay. We only recommend these for business use, though. You can find our list of the best video conferencing apps at the button above!
8Player Lite and the paid version ($5.99) offer a clean and simple way to access video not just on your iPad but any other DLNA-compatible device. The cool thing about 8Player is its interface and it kind of makes up for the lack of a full-fledged video format support. Still, it supports all popular formats although there’s no AC3 support due to the Apple issues.
These are iPad App Reviews for iPad apps we reviewed between 07/2012 and 02/2013. The iPad app reviews include a variety of iPad app genres like: games apps, kids apps, entertainment apps, utilities apps, books apps, education apps, business apps, lifestyle apps, sports apps, family apps, social apps and other iPhone apps we checked out and reviewed during this time.
These are iPad App Reviews for iPad apps we reviewed between 07/2012 and 02/2013. The iPad app reviews include a variety of iPad app genres like: games apps, kids apps, entertainment apps, utilities apps, books apps, education apps, business apps, lifestyle apps, sports apps, family apps, social apps and other iPhone apps we checked out and reviewed during this time.
The app also comes with lots of sound effects and supports voice over layering. There’s also support for stickers, emojis, filters, effects, transitions, color correction, and more. One important feature of Inshot Video Editor is that it also allows you to rotate and flip videos which comes in really handy in certain specific scenarios. Overall, this is a really good video editing app. The only flaw of the app that I find annoying is that the free version runs ads. If you can handle that, you are going to enjoy using this one.

8-in-One Video Solution


Funimate video editor is perfect for creating fun videos easily. It can instantly transform everyday moments into creative videos and enables automatic sharing options to different social sites. It has over 100 advanced video effects which are designed to be a perfect match for editing short videos. You can even make short video loops which can be entertaining.
Adobe Premiere Clip enables you to edit any video right from your Android device quickly. It is fast and fun to use. The best feature about Clip is the automatic video creation capability, i.e., the app can automatically create videos for you with any photos or clips that you choose. Moreover, you can also create your videos with its multiple video editing functions like cutting, trimming, adding transitions, music, filters, effects, etc.
iMovie is a part of Apple’s own suite of products for iOS (and macOS), and is a great video editor app for iPhone that you can try. While you may want to use a more powerful editing software on your Mac, iMovie is more than capable of handling video editing on the iPhone. The app is included with the newer generations of iPhones, and you can use it right out of the box to make some awesome videos directly on your iPhone.
Google Duo is essentially Google's answer to FaceTime. It's also one of the most simple video chat apps available. You simply log in, verify your number, and you're good to go. You can video call other Google Duo users like you're making a normal phone call. It also includes a feature called Knock Knock that lets you see what someone is up to before you answer the video call. The app is cross-platform. That means it works between iOS and Android. Rumor is that a web version is coming for computer support eventually. This is about as easy as it gets for video calling apps. It's really very good.
For presentations, screen sharing is important as are granular options such as the ability to share just one application (Microsoft PowerPoint, for example), document, or image or share your entire desktop. Most of the video conferencing services in this roundup also offer a whiteboard tool, which you can use to sketch out ideas or take notes during the meeting for everyone to see. You also need to consider what the participants are able to do, such as share their screen, enable their webcam, sketch on a shared whiteboard, and even take over the presentation. Think about how much actual collaboration you'd like in your meetings.
8Player Lite and the paid version ($5.99) offer a clean and simple way to access video not just on your iPad but any other DLNA-compatible device. The cool thing about 8Player is its interface and it kind of makes up for the lack of a full-fledged video format support. Still, it supports all popular formats although there’s no AC3 support due to the Apple issues.
Molly K. McLaughlin is a New York-based writer and editor with more than a decade of experience covering technology. She has tested and reviewed all sorts of software, mobile apps, and gadgets. Before launching her freelance business, she was an editor at PC Magazine, covering consumer electronics, followed by a stint at ConsumerSearch.com, a revie... See Full Bio

Particularly intensive is the process of rendering your finished product into a standard video file that will by playable on the target device of choice, be that an HDTV, a laptop, or a smartphone. Most of the software can take advantage of your computer's graphics processor to speed this up. Be sure to check the performance section in each review linked here to see how speedy or slow the application is. In rendering speed testing, CyberLink and Pinnacle have been my perennial champs.

I test each service's prominent features, but it's up to you to decide whether or not you need dial-in numbers, VoIP, or both options for your audio, and whether or not you need video calls in addition to screen sharing. Some services offer both teleconferencing with dial-in numbers (local or toll-free) and VoIP calling, while some offer just one or the other. A few offer international dial-in numbers. Adobe Connect doesn't offer teleconferencing at all but can be integrated with a number of other services. Most offer video calls via webcam, although a few don't.

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