Funimate is one of the surprisingly popular, but not overly powerful video editor apps. It bills itself as being a great app for making music videos or simple videos out of the stuff you already have on your device. There are 15 video filters that you can play with and the creation process is fairly painless. This isn’t something you’d want to use on a serious video. It has things like video effects. However, it's better for short little social media posts rather than actual video production. You can download it for free to try it out yourself.

iPhones are steadily becoming more powerful, and capable of highly intensive tasks. With that, the camera in these smartphones has also improved to an extent that we can even shoot 4K videos. All these capabilities make iPhones highly capable of handling both shooting videos, and editing them. In fact, the latest iPhone XS and iPhone XS Max are powered by Apple A12 Bionic chip which is rivaling the performance prowess of Intel chips used in our laptops. Today, you can not only shoot but edit and publish your videos directly from your iPhone. Keeping that in mind, we are listing out 10 best video editing apps for iPhone which you an use to produce your own professional videos in 2019.

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KMPlayer has been downloaded by more than 300 million people worldwide. It’s a free encoding player that plays almost all kind of video files. The app also supports touch gestures to skip, fast forward, or rewind your video file. It is also useful to increase or decrease the volume. There is no need for in-app purchase, and this is what tempts us to download.
Businesses are moving further apart. That is, many small to midsize businesses (SMBs) are becoming spread out across many geographic locations, which brings complex challenges for communication, even for employees that work in-house. Add customers and partners to the mix, and it's difficult to think about talking to all of these folks without extensive travel, which brings restrictive costs. This is where video conferencing can deliver a serious boost to your company's bottom line.
This great video editing app for iPhone takes you back to old times. You transform the video into a variety of vintage film styles with many combinations to choose from: black & white, sepia, color, vintage sepia, 20's movie or 60's home video, etc. You can speed up or slow down the videos. And several sound options like Video, Piano 1, Piano 2, Movie Projector, etc. are provided to add more feeling to your movie.

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There are plenty of business level video chat apps out there. They function differently from consumer level stuff. For instance, there is a larger emphasis on file sharing, attendance taking, and conferencing tools compared to something like Skype, WhatsApp, or Google Duo. Google Hangouts is slowly making its way to this genre. Some other good options include Zoom, Cisco Webex Meetings, GoToMeeting, and some others. The prices vary, but the software generally works okay. We only recommend these for business use, though. You can find our list of the best video conferencing apps at the button above!

Video doorbells don't offer local storage for recorded video, so you'll have to subscribe to a cloud service in order to view your motion- and doorbell-triggered video clips. Expect to pay anywhere from $3 per month and up for a plan that gives you access to 30 or more days of video that you can download and share. If you want to view older footage, make sure you save your clips as they will be deleted after the allotted time is up.

One of the unique selling points of LumaFusion is its UI. The app looks really clean with no ads or annoying popups to hamper your experience. What I love most about LumaFusion is that it not only allows users to edit videos in landscape mode but also portrait mode. Not only that, you can easily switch between the two modes without any hiccup. This comes helpful as the app  supports a variety of video aspect ratios including landscape, portrait, square, film, and more.


Nothing makes an impression like moving pictures with sound. That's why digital video continues to grow in importance online. Couple that trend with the ever-increasing availability of devices capable of high-resolution video recording—phones, GoPros, DSLRs—and the case for ever-more powerful video editing software becomes clear. Further, the software must be usable by nonprofessionals, and it has to keep up with newer formats such as HEVC (High Efficiency Video Coding) and 360-degree VR video, and it has to be able to handle 4K and higher resolution.
Cameo is another really good video editor app for iPhone, developed by the folks over at Vimeo. The app offers very basic video editing capabilities, but works really well. The interface is clean, and intuitive, and if you just want to perform a couple of basic edits on your video, Cameo is the perfect option. The app can import photos and videos from the camera roll, and you can easily trim them, add music, themes, and more. You can even adjust the intensity of the theme applied to the video, to get the perfect effect.
The app also comes with lots of sound effects and supports voice over layering. There’s also support for stickers, emojis, filters, effects, transitions, color correction, and more. One important feature of Inshot Video Editor is that it also allows you to rotate and flip videos which comes in really handy in certain specific scenarios. Overall, this is a really good video editing app. The only flaw of the app that I find annoying is that the free version runs ads. If you can handle that, you are going to enjoy using this one.
Funimate is one of the surprisingly popular, but not overly powerful video editor apps. It bills itself as being a great app for making music videos or simple videos out of the stuff you already have on your device. There are 15 video filters that you can play with and the creation process is fairly painless. This isn’t something you’d want to use on a serious video. It has things like video effects. However, it's better for short little social media posts rather than actual video production. You can download it for free to try it out yourself.
Free video editing software often comes with legal and technical limitations, however. Some widely used codecs require licensing fees on the part of the software maker, meaning they can't offer free software that can handle these standard file formats. That said, the impressive open-source Shotcut does a lot of the same things that the paid applications in this roundup do, including things like chroma-keying and picture-in-picture. Shotcut is completely open-source and free, while another free option, Lightworks has paid options that remove a 720p output resolution limit. Note also that both Shotcut and Lightworks run on Linux as well as Windows and Mac.
Other measures of performance include startup time and simple stability. Again, video editing is a taxing activity for any computer, involving many components. In the past, video editing programs took longer than most other apps to start up, and unexpected shutdowns were unfortunately common, even in top apps from top developers such as Adobe and Apple. The stability situation has greatly improved, but the complexity of the process, which increases as more powerful effects are added, means crashes will likely never be fully eliminated, and they often raise their ugly heads after a program update, as I found with the latest version of Pinnacle Studio.
One of the capabilities that has been making its way into consumer-level video editing software is more-detailed color grading. Color wheels, curves, and histograms give editors control over the intensity of every shade. Related to this is support for LUTs (lookup tables), also known as CLUTs (color lookup tables). This staple of pro-level software lets you quickly change the look of a video to give it a specific mood. For example, think of the dark blue look of thriller movies like The Revenant. You can download LUTs for free from several sites or use those included with some video software to give your video a specific look. One well-known LUT type is the kind that can make a daytime scene look like it was shot at night.
Quik is from a newer generation of video editor apps. It's halfway decent if you need something simple. The way it works is you add up to 50 photos and video clips into the app. The app then analyzes them and spits out a short video from them. Quik contains about two dozen video styles and you can re-order and customize your video before you export it. It’s not nearly as powerful as something like Adobe Premiere Clip or PowerDirector, but not everyone needs something that intense. It's free to download with no in-app purchases.

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