Of course, none of the extras matter if an app can't do the most basic editing tasks. At this point, however, all of the products included here do a good job of letting you join, trim, and split video clips. They also let you make use of special effects such as animated transitions, picture-in-picture (PiP), chroma-key (the technique that lets you place a subject against any background, often known as green screening), and filters that enhance colors or apply creative effects and distortions. With most of them you can add a multitude of timeline tracks that can accommodate video clips, effects, audio, and text overlays.
Signal Private Messenger is one of the most popular privacy chat apps. It features end-to-end encryption for all messages, voice calls, and video chats between two Signal users. It focuses a lot on individual chats. There are group chat features, but it's mostly for personal use. This is one of the biggest differences between it and rival privacy chat app Telegram. Video calls worked fine in our testing so we have no trouble recommending them. It's a neat way to get some encrypted chats as well. The app is also completely free and open source. You can't really go wrong with it, but there are better video chat apps if you need group video chats.
PowerDirector is a fully featured android video editor that has an easy-to-use timeline interface, but it might take you some time to get used to the controls. However, once you become an expert with this app, you can create professional and effect rich videos within seconds. It has over 30 different effects and transition effects to choose from and add to your video.
Skype is one of the most popular video chat apps for any platform. It has native apps on most platforms, including PC, which makes it one of the best cross-platform options out there. The Android app certainly isn't perfect, but it can usually get the job done. You can do group video calls with up to 25 people. The app also features a free text chat, Microsoft and Facebook account integration, and you can even call regular cell phones for a nominal fee. The app still needs work, but it's definitely better than it was a year or two ago. The cross-platform support is top notch as well.
Support for 4K video source content has become pretty standard in video editing software, but the support varies among the products. For example, some but not all of the applications can import Sony XAVC and XAVC-S formats, which are used by Sony's popular DSLRs, mirrorless cameras, camcorders, and professional video cameras. The same holds true for the H.265 High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) standard. Most of the applications here now can import and export HEVC, though there are still a few holdouts.
Wired doorbells are not quite as easy to install as their wireless counterparts, but they are far from difficult and you don't have to worry about losing power unless your whole house loses power. Since most homes already have doorbell wiring, installing a video doorbell is as easy as removing your old doorbell, disconnecting the two wires, connecting your new doorbell to the wires, and attaching it to the outside of your house. In most cases you can connect the doorbell to an existing chime box as well.
Additionally, video conferencing services tend to offer more than just face-to-face interactions. Best-in-class video conferencing services let users share their screens, remotely access one another's desktops, chat via text, exchange files, communicate via digital whiteboards, and even broadcast conferences to large groups of passive viewers. Some are part of business-geared voice over IP (VoIP) packages, which allows for dynamically changing voice calls to video calls and shared meetings at the touch of a button without establishing new connections.
Many video editing apps now include tools that cater to users of action cameras such as the GoPro Hero7 Black. For example, several offer automated freeze-frame along with speedup, slowdown, and reverse time effects. CyberLink PowerDirector's Action Camera Center pulls together freeze frame with stabilization, slo-mo, and fish-eye correction, and color correction for underwater footage. Magix Movie Edit Pro Premium includes the third-party NewBlue ActionCam Package of effects. And Wondershare Filmora lets you subscribe to new effect packs on an ongoing basis.

Quik is another iPhone video editor app from GoPro. With Quik, you can quickly create good looking videos with just a few taps. The app has the option to import photos and videos from the photo library, or your Facebook, or Instagram account. Once you’ve selected the photos and videos you want to edit, you get the option to add Hilights to the video clips (just like in Splice). However, you get the options to change the format between cinema, and square. Also, you can change the background music for the video, as well add a plethora of filters to the video. Quik also has the option to add a title to the video.

VivaVideo is one of the exceptionally popular video editing apps. In practice, though, it's a very middle-of-the-road video editor. It works especially well for short clips for social media. The app uses a storyboard style of editing where you load clips, edit and trim them as needed, and then move on to the next segment. It includes over 200 video filters and various other effects, text input, and fast and slow motion support. VivaVideo has a free version that comes with a watermark and a time limit for any given video. You can remove these restrictions by buying the pro version.
Imo is a simple video calling and chatting app. It boasts compatibility for 2G, 3G, 4G, and LTE networks. That makes it good for those stuck on worse connections. It's also compatible with both iOS and Android. Otherwise, there isn't much to this one. That's not necessarily a bad thing. Aside from text chatting and video calling, this app doesn't have any bloat holding you back from a simple experience. It's free to download and use. The only thing you'll need to deal with is some advertising.

Skype is one of the most popular video chat apps for any platform. It has native apps on most platforms, including PC, which makes it one of the best cross-platform options out there. The Android app certainly isn't perfect, but it can usually get the job done. You can do group video calls with up to 25 people. The app also features a free text chat, Microsoft and Facebook account integration, and you can even call regular cell phones for a nominal fee. The app still needs work, but it's definitely better than it was a year or two ago. The cross-platform support is top notch as well.


Particularly intensive is the process of rendering your finished product into a standard video file that will by playable on the target device of choice, be that an HDTV, a laptop, or a smartphone. Most of the software can take advantage of your computer's graphics processor to speed this up. Be sure to check the performance section in each review linked here to see how speedy or slow the application is. In rendering speed testing, CyberLink and Pinnacle have been my perennial champs.
Other features to look for include face recognition technology that identifies visitors by name, motion sensing technology that knows the difference between people, cars, and animals, color night vision video (most doorbell cameras use infrared LEDs to provide up to 30 feet of black-and-white video), and a choice of chimes that will help you differentiate between a doorbell press and a motion trigger. Some of latest doorbell cameras offer a pre-buffer feature that records several seconds of activity prior to when a motion sensor is triggered or the doorbell button has been pressed so you can see what happened just before an event.

iMovie is a part of Apple’s own suite of products for iOS (and macOS), and is a great video editor app for iPhone that you can try. While you may want to use a more powerful editing software on your Mac, iMovie is more than capable of handling video editing on the iPhone. The app is included with the newer generations of iPhones, and you can use it right out of the box to make some awesome videos directly on your iPhone.
iMovie is a part of Apple’s own suite of products for iOS (and macOS), and is a great video editor app for iPhone that you can try. While you may want to use a more powerful editing software on your Mac, iMovie is more than capable of handling video editing on the iPhone. The app is included with the newer generations of iPhones, and you can use it right out of the box to make some awesome videos directly on your iPhone.

Sid Diwar


We still live in the days of talkies, so you want to be able to edit the audio in your digital moves as well as the images. Most of the products included here offer canned background music, and many, such as Pinnacle Studio, can even tailor the soundtrack to the exact length of your movie. All of these programs can separate audio and video tracks, and most can clean up background noise and add environmental audio effects such as concert hall reverb. A couple of the products have an auto-ducking feature, which lowers background music during dialog—a definite pro-level plus.
For example, join.me offers a free plan with limited features, which is good for small or even single-employee companies. Many services are scalable depending on the number of hosts and attendees you need. I recommend trying a few of our top-rated video conferencing services before committing to a particular one; try out some of the features to figure out what you really need and what's overkill.
Imo is a simple video calling and chatting app. It boasts compatibility for 2G, 3G, 4G, and LTE networks. That makes it good for those stuck on worse connections. It's also compatible with both iOS and Android. Otherwise, there isn't much to this one. That's not necessarily a bad thing. Aside from text chatting and video calling, this app doesn't have any bloat holding you back from a simple experience. It's free to download and use. The only thing you'll need to deal with is some advertising.
In the midrange, there's Adobe Premiere Elements, which is cross-platform between Macs and PCs, and offers a lot more features and lots of help with creating effects. Professionals and prosumers have powerful, though pricey options in Final Cut Pro X and Adobe Premiere Pro. Final Cut is a deceptively simple application that resembles iMovie in its interface and ease of use, but it offers massively deep capabilities, and many third-party apps integrate with it for even more power. It also makes excellent use of the Touch Bar on the latest MacBook Pro, as shown in photo above. Premiere Pro uses a more traditional timeline and adds a large ecosystem of companion apps and plug-ins. It also excels in collaboration features.

KMPlayer has been downloaded by more than 300 million people worldwide. It’s a free encoding player that plays almost all kind of video files. The app also supports touch gestures to skip, fast forward, or rewind your video file. It is also useful to increase or decrease the volume. There is no need for in-app purchase, and this is what tempts us to download.

Signal Private Messenger is one of the most popular privacy chat apps. It features end-to-end encryption for all messages, voice calls, and video chats between two Signal users. It focuses a lot on individual chats. There are group chat features, but it's mostly for personal use. This is one of the biggest differences between it and rival privacy chat app Telegram. Video calls worked fine in our testing so we have no trouble recommending them. It's a neat way to get some encrypted chats as well. The app is also completely free and open source. You can't really go wrong with it, but there are better video chat apps if you need group video chats.
A tool coming to the latest versions of video editing applications is support for seamless transitions. Picture a scene showing people at a beach, and suddenly the sky zooms in and your in Rome or Paris, but it looks like you're in the same place because the transition glued the two scenes together using the sky. There are plenty of other examples of seamless transition; this magnificent video shows a good selection of them, and is partly responsible for starting the trend.
Support for 4K video source content has become pretty standard in video editing software, but the support varies among the products. For example, some but not all of the applications can import Sony XAVC and XAVC-S formats, which are used by Sony's popular DSLRs, mirrorless cameras, camcorders, and professional video cameras. The same holds true for the H.265 High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) standard. Most of the applications here now can import and export HEVC, though there are still a few holdouts.
Video doorbells don't offer local storage for recorded video, so you'll have to subscribe to a cloud service in order to view your motion- and doorbell-triggered video clips. Expect to pay anywhere from $3 per month and up for a plan that gives you access to 30 or more days of video that you can download and share. If you want to view older footage, make sure you save your clips as they will be deleted after the allotted time is up.
Videoshop is a powerful video editor for iPhone, that will let you perform a plethora of operations on your videos. You can record clips directly from within the app, or import them from your camera roll. Once you have done that, you can add text to the clip, add narration, merge multiple clips into one, and a lot more. You can also add tilt shift to the video, and add transitions between multiple clips. The tool is definitely very powerful, and you can perform a lot of manipulations on your videos using Videoshop.

Other measures of performance include startup time and simple stability. Again, video editing is a taxing activity for any computer, involving many components. In the past, video editing programs took longer than most other apps to start up, and unexpected shutdowns were unfortunately common, even in top apps from top developers such as Adobe and Apple. The stability situation has greatly improved, but the complexity of the process, which increases as more powerful effects are added, means crashes will likely never be fully eliminated, and they often raise their ugly heads after a program update, as I found with the latest version of Pinnacle Studio.
Support for 4K video source content has become pretty standard in video editing software, but the support varies among the products. For example, some but not all of the applications can import Sony XAVC and XAVC-S formats, which are used by Sony's popular DSLRs, mirrorless cameras, camcorders, and professional video cameras. The same holds true for the H.265 High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) standard. Most of the applications here now can import and export HEVC, though there are still a few holdouts.

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