iMovie is a part of Apple’s own suite of products for iOS (and macOS), and is a great video editor app for iPhone that you can try. While you may want to use a more powerful editing software on your Mac, iMovie is more than capable of handling video editing on the iPhone. The app is included with the newer generations of iPhones, and you can use it right out of the box to make some awesome videos directly on your iPhone.

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In the midrange, there's Adobe Premiere Elements, which is cross-platform between Macs and PCs, and offers a lot more features and lots of help with creating effects. Professionals and prosumers have powerful, though pricey options in Final Cut Pro X and Adobe Premiere Pro. Final Cut is a deceptively simple application that resembles iMovie in its interface and ease of use, but it offers massively deep capabilities, and many third-party apps integrate with it for even more power. It also makes excellent use of the Touch Bar on the latest MacBook Pro, as shown in photo above. Premiere Pro uses a more traditional timeline and adds a large ecosystem of companion apps and plug-ins. It also excels in collaboration features.
A tool coming to the latest versions of video editing applications is support for seamless transitions. Picture a scene showing people at a beach, and suddenly the sky zooms in and your in Rome or Paris, but it looks like you're in the same place because the transition glued the two scenes together using the sky. There are plenty of other examples of seamless transition; this magnificent video shows a good selection of them, and is partly responsible for starting the trend.

Signal Private Messenger is one of the most popular privacy chat apps. It features end-to-end encryption for all messages, voice calls, and video chats between two Signal users. It focuses a lot on individual chats. There are group chat features, but it's mostly for personal use. This is one of the biggest differences between it and rival privacy chat app Telegram. Video calls worked fine in our testing so we have no trouble recommending them. It's a neat way to get some encrypted chats as well. The app is also completely free and open source. You can't really go wrong with it, but there are better video chat apps if you need group video chats.
Adobe Premiere Clip is one of the big names when it comes to video editor apps. It has a laundry list of features, including the ability to auto-generate videos using your images and video if you don’t want to do it yourself. If that’s not your thing, you can edit your video manually using a variety of tools, effects, and music. The app boasts that you can use your own music but some users have found this process to be difficult. It does sync and work with Adobe Premiere Pro so you can start a project on one and continue on the next one. However, you'll need an Adobe Creative Cloud account to make all the syncing work.
If you want rich video editing functions like cropping, snipping and splicing, then Viddy isn't for you. But for adding interesting filters and soundtracks, Viddy can be a good option. With a slick interface, it enables you "beautify" your video in a just few clicks. When the editing is done, you can share your videos with a one-click function to Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr and YouTube.
VideoShow Video Editor is one of the more popular video editing apps. It’s a simple video editor that lets you do the basic stuff like trim video, organize your clips, and add music. You’ll also find some additional features like the ability to add emoji and text to videos and a variety of video effects to make things a little more fun. It’s great for stuff like Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram, but it’s not powerful enough for bigger productions. You'll want to check out something else for that. The app is free to download and use with some additional stuff available as in-app purchases.
Other features I look at include the number of participants allowed on a call and the number of video feeds allowed simultaneously. The most generous is Adobe Connect, which is unlimited, but some offer as few as four participants at a time. Consider how important this is to your company. Most services let you record meetings, and a few let you edit the recording right within the software. These recorded meetings can then be used for your records or as webinars for anyone who missed the meeting or for new employees.
Molly K. McLaughlin is a New York-based writer and editor with more than a decade of experience covering technology. She has tested and reviewed all sorts of software, mobile apps, and gadgets. Before launching her freelance business, she was an editor at PC Magazine, covering consumer electronics, followed by a stint at ConsumerSearch.com, a revie... See Full Bio
The latest iPhones are quite capable of handling video editing, even if you’re editing 4K videos shot with your phone. You can easily use any of these apps to edit your videos, and get the perfect movie to share with the world. So, have you ever wanted to edit videos on your iPhone? If so, what app did you use to do it. Also, if you know of any other app that deserves to be on this list, do let us know about it in the comments section below.
FilmoraGo for iOS is an easy-to-use app to take your normal, everyday videos into artist creations that will look like it cost hundreds of dollars to create. Just choose a video, select an overall theme and design for the video and add the music you like. It also provides basic video editing functions like trim, filters and transitions. Another great part is that, it automates your video, allowing you to just pick the best parts that you need and let the app do the rest.
Cameo is another really good video editor app for iPhone, developed by the folks over at Vimeo. The app offers very basic video editing capabilities, but works really well. The interface is clean, and intuitive, and if you just want to perform a couple of basic edits on your video, Cameo is the perfect option. The app can import photos and videos from the camera roll, and you can easily trim them, add music, themes, and more. You can even adjust the intensity of the theme applied to the video, to get the perfect effect.
As a Contributing Editor for PCMag, John Delaney has been testing and reviewing monitors, TVs, PCs, networking and smart home gear, and other assorted hardware and peripherals for almost 20 years. A 13-year veteran of PC Magazine's Labs (most recently as Director of Operations), John was responsible for the recruitment, training and management of t... See Full Bio

High Impact Sales Videos


Nothing makes an impression like moving pictures with sound. That's why digital video continues to grow in importance online. Couple that trend with the ever-increasing availability of devices capable of high-resolution video recording—phones, GoPros, DSLRs—and the case for ever-more powerful video editing software becomes clear. Further, the software must be usable by nonprofessionals, and it has to keep up with newer formats such as HEVC (High Efficiency Video Coding) and 360-degree VR video, and it has to be able to handle 4K and higher resolution.
Video editing is one of the most computing-intensive activities around, so you'll want the best laptop or desktop you can afford if you're serious about cutting your own movies. Most applications help speed up the editing process by creating a proxy file of lower resolution, so that normal editing and previewing aren't slowed down by the huge full-resolution files.

In all of these reviews, I hosted and joined meetings to test the experience of both registered and non-registered users. I outline how easy is to join a meeting, including whether or not a participant needs to download software before joining an online meeting (which could cause a delay). In this case, it's important to communicate with employees about hardware compatibility and preferred browser. Other services simply require that attendees enter a code to access the meeting.

I've been seeing a lot of attention paid to creating title effects in the applications over the past year. Apple Final Cut Pro X has added 3D title creation, which is pretty spiffy, letting you extrude 2D titles and rotate them on three axes. Corel VideoStudio in its latest version also adds 3D Titling, though not as powerful as Apple's. PowerDirector's Title Designer offers transparency, gradient color, border, blur level, and reflection in titles; Magix has impressive title templates, complete with animations. Premiere Elements offers a nifty title effect in which your video fills the text characters, and Corel recently followed suit in VideoStudio 2019. Look for an application that lets you edit titles in WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) mode, so that you can type, format, and time it right over the video preview.


KMPlayer has been downloaded by more than 300 million people worldwide. It’s a free encoding player that plays almost all kind of video files. The app also supports touch gestures to skip, fast forward, or rewind your video file. It is also useful to increase or decrease the volume. There is no need for in-app purchase, and this is what tempts us to download.
Video Crop is a video editor app for iPhone that performs only one task – cropping videos. If you have a video that you want to crop, and you want an app that can do it quickly and smoothly, you should definitely check out Video Crop. The interface is very intuitive. You simply choose the video you want to crop, and then you can select the area you want to crop.
Particularly intensive is the process of rendering your finished product into a standard video file that will by playable on the target device of choice, be that an HDTV, a laptop, or a smartphone. Most of the software can take advantage of your computer's graphics processor to speed this up. Be sure to check the performance section in each review linked here to see how speedy or slow the application is. In rendering speed testing, CyberLink and Pinnacle have been my perennial champs.
Love FilmoraGo! This app is truly amazing! I usually download apps first and give them a good try before rating them but this right here beats any other editing app. I just made an edit and it turned out perfect. Hope to see this grow further in the near future! Also some frame rate issues could be fixed. Occurs a lot when tiny clips are combined, not allowing it to play right. Overall a great app.
One of the capabilities that has been making its way into consumer-level video editing software is more-detailed color grading. Color wheels, curves, and histograms give editors control over the intensity of every shade. Related to this is support for LUTs (lookup tables), also known as CLUTs (color lookup tables). This staple of pro-level software lets you quickly change the look of a video to give it a specific mood. For example, think of the dark blue look of thriller movies like The Revenant. You can download LUTs for free from several sites or use those included with some video software to give your video a specific look. One well-known LUT type is the kind that can make a daytime scene look like it was shot at night.
CutStory is a video editing app for Instagram stories. It makes it easy to chop a longer video up into the required length for Instagram Stories (15 seconds maximum per clip). This way, you can repurpose longer videos—from your brand’s YouTube library, for example—and create more robust content without having to continually stop and start the camera.
If you want rich video editing functions like cropping, snipping and splicing, then Viddy isn't for you. But for adding interesting filters and soundtracks, Viddy can be a good option. With a slick interface, it enables you "beautify" your video in a just few clicks. When the editing is done, you can share your videos with a one-click function to Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr and YouTube.
Another handy feature to look for is support for Alexa voice commands that let you view a doorbell's live stream on an Amazon-enabled display. Once you've enabled the skill, simply say "Alexa, show the front door" to launch a live stream on your Echo Show or Fire TV-enabled TV or monitor. Similar voice commands are also available using Google Assistant.

OPlayer Lite is currently one of the best video players for iPad. It has excellent support for almost all formats (the latest update includes MKV support too). There’s an AC3 issue with the current version though — still, a far better player than many others out there. The decoding can be particularly tricky with other apps, but Oplayer appears to handle it quite well.
Of course, none of the extras matter if an app can't do the most basic editing tasks. At this point, however, all of the products included here do a good job of letting you join, trim, and split video clips. They also let you make use of special effects such as animated transitions, picture-in-picture (PiP), chroma-key (the technique that lets you place a subject against any background, often known as green screening), and filters that enhance colors or apply creative effects and distortions. With most of them you can add a multitude of timeline tracks that can accommodate video clips, effects, audio, and text overlays.
Molly K. McLaughlin is a New York-based writer and editor with more than a decade of experience covering technology. She has tested and reviewed all sorts of software, mobile apps, and gadgets. Before launching her freelance business, she was an editor at PC Magazine, covering consumer electronics, followed by a stint at ConsumerSearch.com, a revie... See Full Bio
You can then crop, add effects and text to the video. You can also change the transitions between two Hilights. Once you’re done with the edits, you can share the video with links, or directly to popular services such as YouTube, Facebook, etc. You can even save the video to your camera roll. The app is a simple, yet powerful video editor that you should definitely try out on your iPhone.

Free video editing software often comes with legal and technical limitations, however. Some widely used codecs require licensing fees on the part of the software maker, meaning they can't offer free software that can handle these standard file formats. That said, the impressive open-source Shotcut does a lot of the same things that the paid applications in this roundup do, including things like chroma-keying and picture-in-picture. Shotcut is completely open-source and free, while another free option, Lightworks has paid options that remove a 720p output resolution limit. Note also that both Shotcut and Lightworks run on Linux as well as Windows and Mac.

One of the capabilities that has been making its way into consumer-level video editing software is more-detailed color grading. Color wheels, curves, and histograms give editors control over the intensity of every shade. Related to this is support for LUTs (lookup tables), also known as CLUTs (color lookup tables). This staple of pro-level software lets you quickly change the look of a video to give it a specific mood. For example, think of the dark blue look of thriller movies like The Revenant. You can download LUTs for free from several sites or use those included with some video software to give your video a specific look. One well-known LUT type is the kind that can make a daytime scene look like it was shot at night.


Splice is a video editor from GoPro, the company behind some of the world’s best action cameras. You can import your photos and videos into the app, to edit them into a movie. The way the app works is simple: you just import the videos that you want to edit, and mark the important parts (Hilights, as the app calls them) of the video. You can then add music to the video, and then the app automatically clips the entire video according to the Hilights that you marked.
CutStory is a video editing app for Instagram stories. It makes it easy to chop a longer video up into the required length for Instagram Stories (15 seconds maximum per clip). This way, you can repurpose longer videos—from your brand’s YouTube library, for example—and create more robust content without having to continually stop and start the camera.

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