Free video editing software often comes with legal and technical limitations, however. Some widely used codecs require licensing fees on the part of the software maker, meaning they can't offer free software that can handle these standard file formats. That said, the impressive open-source Shotcut does a lot of the same things that the paid applications in this roundup do, including things like chroma-keying and picture-in-picture. Shotcut is completely open-source and free, while another free option, Lightworks has paid options that remove a 720p output resolution limit. Note also that both Shotcut and Lightworks run on Linux as well as Windows and Mac.


One easy way to safeguard your against property theft, home invasion, porch pirates, and even unwanted solicitors is to identify who is at your doorstep before opening the door. Enter the video doorbell, a first line of defense for homeowners that not only lets you see and speak with the person outside, but also records footage of visitors that approach your door while you're away or unable to answer. These devices typically use Wi-Fi to stream live video to your phone and offer a variety of features, including cloud video storage, motion detection, sirens, and interoperability with smart locks and other smart home devices. Read on to find out what to look for when choosing a video doorbell for your home.

Magisto is a very simple video editor app. With this app, you don’t get any features such as adding text overlays, tilt shifts, etc to your video. However, the charm of this app lies in its simplicity. Within the app, you can import your photos and videos, and choose a theme for the video. There are a number of themes available, such as dance, among many others. Once you’ve done that, you get the option to add music to the video, as well as options to decide how long you want the video to be.


OPlayer Lite is currently one of the best video players for iPad. It has excellent support for almost all formats (the latest update includes MKV support too). There’s an AC3 issue with the current version though — still, a far better player than many others out there. The decoding can be particularly tricky with other apps, but Oplayer appears to handle it quite well.
FilmoraGo is a video editor app by Wondershare. It's easily one of the best video editor apps. This video editor packs a whallop. You can do the basics like trim and cut, render, and that kind of stuff. It also includes the ability to play in reverse, do square videos (1:1) for Instagram, and 16:9 videos for YouTube specifically. It also has support for things like slow motion, transitions, music, overlays, and more. It's not half bad for what you get. There are in-app purchases that add to the power. However, most of the features are, in fact, free.
KineMaster Video Editor is one of the best iPhone Video editing apps that you can use. The app offers professional level editing tools and yet makes it easy to start your video editing journey. One of the good things about this app is that it supports landscape, portrait, and square video formats. So whether you are editing your family video, a video for YouTube or for Instagram, you can edit your videos using KineMaster. Another good thing about this app is that even the free version doesn’t show any ads.
Magisto is a very simple video editor app. With this app, you don’t get any features such as adding text overlays, tilt shifts, etc to your video. However, the charm of this app lies in its simplicity. Within the app, you can import your photos and videos, and choose a theme for the video. There are a number of themes available, such as dance, among many others. Once you’ve done that, you get the option to add music to the video, as well as options to decide how long you want the video to be.
Businesses are moving further apart. That is, many small to midsize businesses (SMBs) are becoming spread out across many geographic locations, which brings complex challenges for communication, even for employees that work in-house. Add customers and partners to the mix, and it's difficult to think about talking to all of these folks without extensive travel, which brings restrictive costs. This is where video conferencing can deliver a serious boost to your company's bottom line.
Increasingly, new capabilities trickle down from professional-level software to the consumer category. That's a good thing for nonprofessional movie editors, since the more consumer-oriented software tends to make easier procedures that can sometimes be pretty tricky in the pro-level software. Read on for a survey of the latest trends in video editing software along with our top picks in the field.
The latest iPhones are quite capable of handling video editing, even if you’re editing 4K videos shot with your phone. You can easily use any of these apps to edit your videos, and get the perfect movie to share with the world. So, have you ever wanted to edit videos on your iPhone? If so, what app did you use to do it. Also, if you know of any other app that deserves to be on this list, do let us know about it in the comments section below.
KineMaster is one of the most powerful video editor apps available. You can do the basics like most of these other video editors can. However, this one includes multiple video, image and effect layers. Additionally, there are audio filters, chroma key (for your green screen fans out there), various video effects, transitions, and more. It's not as powerful as a full desktop editor. However, this gets much closer than most other competitors. We would recommend this for actual video production (at least for stuff like YouTube). You can use it for free in trial mode for a while. However, you'll need the $4.99 per month subscription to get everything forever.
CutStory is a video editing app for Instagram stories. It makes it easy to chop a longer video up into the required length for Instagram Stories (15 seconds maximum per clip). This way, you can repurpose longer videos—from your brand’s YouTube library, for example—and create more robust content without having to continually stop and start the camera.

paul ponna muncheye

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