For those who have an iPhone or intend to buy one, iMovie is absolutely the best iPhone video editing app. It helps you turn the various video (including HD videos) you shoot into a gorgeous home movie with movie themes, titles, transitions and sound effects, etc. And you can also shoot a new video clip inside the application for better video editing on iPhone.
The latest iPhones are quite capable of handling video editing, even if you’re editing 4K videos shot with your phone. You can easily use any of these apps to edit your videos, and get the perfect movie to share with the world. So, have you ever wanted to edit videos on your iPhone? If so, what app did you use to do it. Also, if you know of any other app that deserves to be on this list, do let us know about it in the comments section below.
CutStory is a video editing app for Instagram stories. It makes it easy to chop a longer video up into the required length for Instagram Stories (15 seconds maximum per clip). This way, you can repurpose longer videos—from your brand’s YouTube library, for example—and create more robust content without having to continually stop and start the camera.
Our reviews also cover the host's admin features. The best services let you set up different types of meetings, such as a lecture-style meeting in which all participants are muted, or a discussion or Q&A mode in which presenters can mute and unmute participants as needed or let all participants speak. If you have ever been distracted by the sound of someone typing or a barking dog in the background, then you'll appreciate these controls. Other options include enabling and disabling webcams, locking latecomers out of a meeting, creating a waiting room while preparing for the meeting, and allowing break-out sessions.
JusTalk is another one of the lesser-known video chat apps. However, it's actually pretty decent. You'll be able to theme your app as you please. Additionally, you can do things like doodle while in a video call to add a bit of fun to the proceedings. It also features group chats, encryption, and cross-platform support. It's a decent alternative to something like Google Duo where video calls are the primary feature. However, we don't see it competing too favorably with a chat app that also has video chat features. The app is free to download and use. The in-app purchases are for things like themes and other personalization perks. They don't affect functionality, really.
Another program, VSDC Video Editor Pro, simply has too outdated an interface, making common tasks difficult. Longtime pro video editors will note the absence of Avid Media Composer, which is simply too unwieldy for PCMag's primarily consumer audience. There are a couple of more interesting applications—NCH VideoPad and AVS Video Editor among them—that we simply haven't tested yet.
Our reviews also cover the host's admin features. The best services let you set up different types of meetings, such as a lecture-style meeting in which all participants are muted, or a discussion or Q&A mode in which presenters can mute and unmute participants as needed or let all participants speak. If you have ever been distracted by the sound of someone typing or a barking dog in the background, then you'll appreciate these controls. Other options include enabling and disabling webcams, locking latecomers out of a meeting, creating a waiting room while preparing for the meeting, and allowing break-out sessions.
Other features I look at include the number of participants allowed on a call and the number of video feeds allowed simultaneously. The most generous is Adobe Connect, which is unlimited, but some offer as few as four participants at a time. Consider how important this is to your company. Most services let you record meetings, and a few let you edit the recording right within the software. These recorded meetings can then be used for your records or as webinars for anyone who missed the meeting or for new employees.
Any smart doorbell worth its salt is equipped with a video camera that sends an alert to your phone along with a live video stream when the doorbell button is pressed. Video is accessed via a mobile app that is also used to install the device, configure wireless settings, and set up alerts. You'll pay more for doorbells that offer features like 1080p video, motion detection, two-way audio that lets you speak with whoever is out there, and on-demand video streaming. To avoid false alerts from passing cars, high winds, and any critters you may have roaming around your property, look for a doorbell cam that offers customizable motion zones.

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