Support for 4K video source content has become pretty standard in video editing software, but the support varies among the products. For example, some but not all of the applications can import Sony XAVC and XAVC-S formats, which are used by Sony's popular DSLRs, mirrorless cameras, camcorders, and professional video cameras. The same holds true for the H.265 High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) standard. Most of the applications here now can import and export HEVC, though there are still a few holdouts.

video app


Adobe Premiere Clip is one of the big names when it comes to video editor apps. It has a laundry list of features, including the ability to auto-generate videos using your images and video if you don’t want to do it yourself. If that’s not your thing, you can edit your video manually using a variety of tools, effects, and music. The app boasts that you can use your own music but some users have found this process to be difficult. It does sync and work with Adobe Premiere Pro so you can start a project on one and continue on the next one. However, you'll need an Adobe Creative Cloud account to make all the syncing work.
InShot is an easy to use video editor for your iPhone which brings tons of features. The app allows you to edit both photos and videos and also create video collages. When it comes to editing, you will find all the basic editing tools here such as cut, trim, delete, merge, adjust video, and more. You can also add your own music or select from its own free music options. The app is also good for Instagram users as it allows you to edit square videos perfect for Instagram.

Another program, VSDC Video Editor Pro, simply has too outdated an interface, making common tasks difficult. Longtime pro video editors will note the absence of Avid Media Composer, which is simply too unwieldy for PCMag's primarily consumer audience. There are a couple of more interesting applications—NCH VideoPad and AVS Video Editor among them—that we simply haven't tested yet.
FilmoraGo is a video editor app by Wondershare. It's easily one of the best video editor apps. This video editor packs a whallop. You can do the basics like trim and cut, render, and that kind of stuff. It also includes the ability to play in reverse, do square videos (1:1) for Instagram, and 16:9 videos for YouTube specifically. It also has support for things like slow motion, transitions, music, overlays, and more. It's not half bad for what you get. There are in-app purchases that add to the power. However, most of the features are, in fact, free.
CutStory is a video editing app for Instagram stories. It makes it easy to chop a longer video up into the required length for Instagram Stories (15 seconds maximum per clip). This way, you can repurpose longer videos—from your brand’s YouTube library, for example—and create more robust content without having to continually stop and start the camera.

paul ponna muncheye

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