KineMaster is one of the most powerful video editor apps available. You can do the basics like most of these other video editors can. However, this one includes multiple video, image and effect layers. Additionally, there are audio filters, chroma key (for your green screen fans out there), various video effects, transitions, and more. It's not as powerful as a full desktop editor. However, this gets much closer than most other competitors. We would recommend this for actual video production (at least for stuff like YouTube). You can use it for free in trial mode for a while. However, you'll need the $4.99 per month subscription to get everything forever.
Nothing makes an impression like moving pictures with sound. That's why digital video continues to grow in importance online. Couple that trend with the ever-increasing availability of devices capable of high-resolution video recording—phones, GoPros, DSLRs—and the case for ever-more powerful video editing software becomes clear. Further, the software must be usable by nonprofessionals, and it has to keep up with newer formats such as HEVC (High Efficiency Video Coding) and 360-degree VR video, and it has to be able to handle 4K and higher resolution.
OPlayer Lite is currently one of the best video players for iPad. It has excellent support for almost all formats (the latest update includes MKV support too). There’s an AC3 issue with the current version though — still, a far better player than many others out there. The decoding can be particularly tricky with other apps, but Oplayer appears to handle it quite well.

I test each service's prominent features, but it's up to you to decide whether or not you need dial-in numbers, VoIP, or both options for your audio, and whether or not you need video calls in addition to screen sharing. Some services offer both teleconferencing with dial-in numbers (local or toll-free) and VoIP calling, while some offer just one or the other. A few offer international dial-in numbers. Adobe Connect doesn't offer teleconferencing at all but can be integrated with a number of other services. Most offer video calls via webcam, although a few don't.


Support for 4K video source content has become pretty standard in video editing software, but the support varies among the products. For example, some but not all of the applications can import Sony XAVC and XAVC-S formats, which are used by Sony's popular DSLRs, mirrorless cameras, camcorders, and professional video cameras. The same holds true for the H.265 High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) standard. Most of the applications here now can import and export HEVC, though there are still a few holdouts.
When it comes to video editing on iPhone, no other app comes even close to the feature set that is packed inside LumaFusion. It is the only outright paid app on this list and it deserve every cent. The app is not only used by YouTubers but even mobile journalists and professional video producers who don’t want to carry heavy camera gear and editing rig where they go.

KMPlayer has been downloaded by more than 300 million people worldwide. It’s a free encoding player that plays almost all kind of video files. The app also supports touch gestures to skip, fast forward, or rewind your video file. It is also useful to increase or decrease the volume. There is no need for in-app purchase, and this is what tempts us to download.


Skype is one of the most popular video chat apps for any platform. It has native apps on most platforms, including PC, which makes it one of the best cross-platform options out there. The Android app certainly isn't perfect, but it can usually get the job done. You can do group video calls with up to 25 people. The app also features a free text chat, Microsoft and Facebook account integration, and you can even call regular cell phones for a nominal fee. The app still needs work, but it's definitely better than it was a year or two ago. The cross-platform support is top notch as well.

Signal Private Messenger is one of the most popular privacy chat apps. It features end-to-end encryption for all messages, voice calls, and video chats between two Signal users. It focuses a lot on individual chats. There are group chat features, but it's mostly for personal use. This is one of the biggest differences between it and rival privacy chat app Telegram. Video calls worked fine in our testing so we have no trouble recommending them. It's a neat way to get some encrypted chats as well. The app is also completely free and open source. You can't really go wrong with it, but there are better video chat apps if you need group video chats.

paul ponna

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