Instead of spending half your life in airport lines, bring life to your meetings by using a video conferencing service. This way, the presenter is not just a voice on the phone but an on-screen presence who is able to see and interact with other attendees, share presentations, and more. For collaborative meetings, the host can sketch out ideas on an online whiteboard and invite participants to join in. Some video conferencing services let presenters pass control to another participant who can continue the meeting without interruption. Others let hosts deny access to latecomers to further avoid disruption.

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Videoshop is a powerful video editor for iPhone, that will let you perform a plethora of operations on your videos. You can record clips directly from within the app, or import them from your camera roll. Once you have done that, you can add text to the clip, add narration, merge multiple clips into one, and a lot more. You can also add tilt shift to the video, and add transitions between multiple clips. The tool is definitely very powerful, and you can perform a lot of manipulations on your videos using Videoshop.

Video doorbells and home security cameras offer many of the same benefits. Both will show you what is going on outside of your home, both offer motion detection and motion-triggered recording, and in most cases, both let you speak to whoever is out there. That said, the simple fact is that security cameras lack the doorbell component. If you're downstairs doing the laundry and your phone is upstairs, a security camera won't tell you that someone is at the door, but the doorbell will (when pressed).
To help, you'll need to investigate different VPN offerings for those remote connections, and potentially work with your IT professional to implement quality of service (QoS) on your network that'll protect the bandwidth used by video conferences while they're happening. If you're already using a cloud PBX-based voice over IP (VoIP) system for your phone calls, your IT people will already have a good idea how to protect traffic this way as the requirements are very similiar.
Google Duo is essentially Google's answer to FaceTime. It's also one of the most simple video chat apps available. You simply log in, verify your number, and you're good to go. You can video call other Google Duo users like you're making a normal phone call. It also includes a feature called Knock Knock that lets you see what someone is up to before you answer the video call. The app is cross-platform. That means it works between iOS and Android. Rumor is that a web version is coming for computer support eventually. This is about as easy as it gets for video calling apps. It's really very good.
Other features I look at include the number of participants allowed on a call and the number of video feeds allowed simultaneously. The most generous is Adobe Connect, which is unlimited, but some offer as few as four participants at a time. Consider how important this is to your company. Most services let you record meetings, and a few let you edit the recording right within the software. These recorded meetings can then be used for your records or as webinars for anyone who missed the meeting or for new employees.
Splice is a video editor from GoPro, the company behind some of the world’s best action cameras. You can import your photos and videos into the app, to edit them into a movie. The way the app works is simple: you just import the videos that you want to edit, and mark the important parts (Hilights, as the app calls them) of the video. You can then add music to the video, and then the app automatically clips the entire video according to the Hilights that you marked.
Molly K. McLaughlin is a New York-based writer and editor with more than a decade of experience covering technology. She has tested and reviewed all sorts of software, mobile apps, and gadgets. Before launching her freelance business, she was an editor at PC Magazine, covering consumer electronics, followed by a stint at ConsumerSearch.com, a revie... See Full Bio

Support for 4K video source content has become pretty standard in video editing software, but the support varies among the products. For example, some but not all of the applications can import Sony XAVC and XAVC-S formats, which are used by Sony's popular DSLRs, mirrorless cameras, camcorders, and professional video cameras. The same holds true for the H.265 High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) standard. Most of the applications here now can import and export HEVC, though there are still a few holdouts.


Using this app, you can create awesome green screen videos. PowerDirector also comes with tutorial videos for all of its functions. Most of its features are available in the free version, but upgrading to the full version allows you to remove watermark, ads, and even to extract videos in 1080 and 4K resolutions. It is supported in Android 4.3 and above.

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Once you have found packages in your price range, the most important consideration is ease of use. Obviously, if the user interface (UI) is difficult for you and your colleagues to navigate and use, then it's going to cause delays in meeting start times, which will frustrate everyone. For each review, I discuss the ease of signing up, creating a meeting, inviting participants, and setting up audio and video controls. I also look at the user experience (UX) from the meeting invitees' point of view, which can make or break a meeting.
While there are a vast number of video editing software available for PC, free video editor apps for Android smartphones are no less in the Google Play Store. They are convenient to work with and have a collection of amazing features. Here, we have compiled a list of best Android video editor apps for 2019 which are free in the Play Store. With these editors, you can arrange the clips to perfection and also upload the videos to Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, or YouTube.
There are plenty of business level video chat apps out there. They function differently from consumer level stuff. For instance, there is a larger emphasis on file sharing, attendance taking, and conferencing tools compared to something like Skype, WhatsApp, or Google Duo. Google Hangouts is slowly making its way to this genre. Some other good options include Zoom, Cisco Webex Meetings, GoToMeeting, and some others. The prices vary, but the software generally works okay. We only recommend these for business use, though. You can find our list of the best video conferencing apps at the button above!
Funimate is one of the surprisingly popular, but not overly powerful video editor apps. It bills itself as being a great app for making music videos or simple videos out of the stuff you already have on your device. There are 15 video filters that you can play with and the creation process is fairly painless. This isn’t something you’d want to use on a serious video. It has things like video effects. However, it's better for short little social media posts rather than actual video production. You can download it for free to try it out yourself.
Quik is another iPhone video editor app from GoPro. With Quik, you can quickly create good looking videos with just a few taps. The app has the option to import photos and videos from the photo library, or your Facebook, or Instagram account. Once you’ve selected the photos and videos you want to edit, you get the option to add Hilights to the video clips (just like in Splice). However, you get the options to change the format between cinema, and square. Also, you can change the background music for the video, as well add a plethora of filters to the video. Quik also has the option to add a title to the video.
Several of the products here (Adobe Premiere Elements is a notable exception) still support 3D video editing if that's your thing, though the this has been replaced by 360-degree VR footage like that shot by the Samsung Gear 360 as the current home-theater fad. As is often the case, our Editors' Choice, CyberLink PowerDirector was the first product in this group to offer support for this new kind of video media.

OPlayer Lite is currently one of the best video players for iPad. It has excellent support for almost all formats (the latest update includes MKV support too). There’s an AC3 issue with the current version though — still, a far better player than many others out there. The decoding can be particularly tricky with other apps, but Oplayer appears to handle it quite well.


KineMaster is one of the most powerful video editor apps available. You can do the basics like most of these other video editors can. However, this one includes multiple video, image and effect layers. Additionally, there are audio filters, chroma key (for your green screen fans out there), various video effects, transitions, and more. It's not as powerful as a full desktop editor. However, this gets much closer than most other competitors. We would recommend this for actual video production (at least for stuff like YouTube). You can use it for free in trial mode for a while. However, you'll need the $4.99 per month subscription to get everything forever.
There are plenty of business level video chat apps out there. They function differently from consumer level stuff. For instance, there is a larger emphasis on file sharing, attendance taking, and conferencing tools compared to something like Skype, WhatsApp, or Google Duo. Google Hangouts is slowly making its way to this genre. Some other good options include Zoom, Cisco Webex Meetings, GoToMeeting, and some others. The prices vary, but the software generally works okay. We only recommend these for business use, though. You can find our list of the best video conferencing apps at the button above!
Several of the products here (Adobe Premiere Elements is a notable exception) still support 3D video editing if that's your thing, though the this has been replaced by 360-degree VR footage like that shot by the Samsung Gear 360 as the current home-theater fad. As is often the case, our Editors' Choice, CyberLink PowerDirector was the first product in this group to offer support for this new kind of video media.
8Player Lite and the paid version ($5.99) offer a clean and simple way to access video not just on your iPad but any other DLNA-compatible device. The cool thing about 8Player is its interface and it kind of makes up for the lack of a full-fledged video format support. Still, it supports all popular formats although there’s no AC3 support due to the Apple issues.

VivaVideo is one of the exceptionally popular video editing apps. In practice, though, it's a very middle-of-the-road video editor. It works especially well for short clips for social media. The app uses a storyboard style of editing where you load clips, edit and trim them as needed, and then move on to the next segment. It includes over 200 video filters and various other effects, text input, and fast and slow motion support. VivaVideo has a free version that comes with a watermark and a time limit for any given video. You can remove these restrictions by buying the pro version.
Other features to look for include face recognition technology that identifies visitors by name, motion sensing technology that knows the difference between people, cars, and animals, color night vision video (most doorbell cameras use infrared LEDs to provide up to 30 feet of black-and-white video), and a choice of chimes that will help you differentiate between a doorbell press and a motion trigger. Some of latest doorbell cameras offer a pre-buffer feature that records several seconds of activity prior to when a motion sensor is triggered or the doorbell button has been pressed so you can see what happened just before an event.
I test each service's prominent features, but it's up to you to decide whether or not you need dial-in numbers, VoIP, or both options for your audio, and whether or not you need video calls in addition to screen sharing. Some services offer both teleconferencing with dial-in numbers (local or toll-free) and VoIP calling, while some offer just one or the other. A few offer international dial-in numbers. Adobe Connect doesn't offer teleconferencing at all but can be integrated with a number of other services. Most offer video calls via webcam, although a few don't.

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