When it comes to video editing on iPhone, no other app comes even close to the feature set that is packed inside LumaFusion. It is the only outright paid app on this list and it deserve every cent. The app is not only used by YouTubers but even mobile journalists and professional video producers who don’t want to carry heavy camera gear and editing rig where they go.
Videoshop is a powerful video editor for iPhone, that will let you perform a plethora of operations on your videos. You can record clips directly from within the app, or import them from your camera roll. Once you have done that, you can add text to the clip, add narration, merge multiple clips into one, and a lot more. You can also add tilt shift to the video, and add transitions between multiple clips. The tool is definitely very powerful, and you can perform a lot of manipulations on your videos using Videoshop.
iPhones are steadily becoming more powerful, and capable of highly intensive tasks. With that, the camera in these smartphones has also improved to an extent that we can even shoot 4K videos. All these capabilities make iPhones highly capable of handling both shooting videos, and editing them. In fact, the latest iPhone XS and iPhone XS Max are powered by Apple A12 Bionic chip which is rivaling the performance prowess of Intel chips used in our laptops. Today, you can not only shoot but edit and publish your videos directly from your iPhone. Keeping that in mind, we are listing out 10 best video editing apps for iPhone which you an use to produce your own professional videos in 2019.

SAAS Business Package


Particularly intensive is the process of rendering your finished product into a standard video file that will by playable on the target device of choice, be that an HDTV, a laptop, or a smartphone. Most of the software can take advantage of your computer's graphics processor to speed this up. Be sure to check the performance section in each review linked here to see how speedy or slow the application is. In rendering speed testing, CyberLink and Pinnacle have been my perennial champs.


Quik is another iPhone video editor app from GoPro. With Quik, you can quickly create good looking videos with just a few taps. The app has the option to import photos and videos from the photo library, or your Facebook, or Instagram account. Once you’ve selected the photos and videos you want to edit, you get the option to add Hilights to the video clips (just like in Splice). However, you get the options to change the format between cinema, and square. Also, you can change the background music for the video, as well add a plethora of filters to the video. Quik also has the option to add a title to the video.
I test each service's prominent features, but it's up to you to decide whether or not you need dial-in numbers, VoIP, or both options for your audio, and whether or not you need video calls in addition to screen sharing. Some services offer both teleconferencing with dial-in numbers (local or toll-free) and VoIP calling, while some offer just one or the other. A few offer international dial-in numbers. Adobe Connect doesn't offer teleconferencing at all but can be integrated with a number of other services. Most offer video calls via webcam, although a few don't.

FilmoraGo is a video editor app by Wondershare. It's easily one of the best video editor apps. This video editor packs a whallop. You can do the basics like trim and cut, render, and that kind of stuff. It also includes the ability to play in reverse, do square videos (1:1) for Instagram, and 16:9 videos for YouTube specifically. It also has support for things like slow motion, transitions, music, overlays, and more. It's not half bad for what you get. There are in-app purchases that add to the power. However, most of the features are, in fact, free.


Another impressive effect that has made its way into consumer-level video editing software is motion tracking, which lets you attach an object or effect to something moving in your video. You might use it to put a blur over the face of someone you don't want to show up in your video. You specify the target face, and the app takes care of the rest, tracking the face and moving the effect to follow it. This used to be the sole province of special effects software such as Adobe After Effects. Corel VideoStudio was the first of the consumer products to include motion tracking, and it still leads the pack in the depth and usability of its motion-tracking tool, though several others now include the capability.
Google Duo is essentially Google's answer to FaceTime. It's also one of the most simple video chat apps available. You simply log in, verify your number, and you're good to go. You can video call other Google Duo users like you're making a normal phone call. It also includes a feature called Knock Knock that lets you see what someone is up to before you answer the video call. The app is cross-platform. That means it works between iOS and Android. Rumor is that a web version is coming for computer support eventually. This is about as easy as it gets for video calling apps. It's really very good.
Cameo is another really good video editor app for iPhone, developed by the folks over at Vimeo. The app offers very basic video editing capabilities, but works really well. The interface is clean, and intuitive, and if you just want to perform a couple of basic edits on your video, Cameo is the perfect option. The app can import photos and videos from the camera roll, and you can easily trim them, add music, themes, and more. You can even adjust the intensity of the theme applied to the video, to get the perfect effect.
Advanced abilities continue to make their way into accessible, affordable, and consumer-friendly video editing software as each new generation of software is released. For example, multicam editing, which lets you switch among camera angles of the same scene shot with multiple video cameras, used to be a feature relegated to pro-level software. Now this and many other advanced effects are available in programs designed for use by nonprofessional enthusiasts.

Other features to look for include face recognition technology that identifies visitors by name, motion sensing technology that knows the difference between people, cars, and animals, color night vision video (most doorbell cameras use infrared LEDs to provide up to 30 feet of black-and-white video), and a choice of chimes that will help you differentiate between a doorbell press and a motion trigger. Some of latest doorbell cameras offer a pre-buffer feature that records several seconds of activity prior to when a motion sensor is triggered or the doorbell button has been pressed so you can see what happened just before an event.
Though Mac users don't have the sheer number of software choices available for PCs, Apple fans interested in editing video are well served, by four products in particular. At the entry level, the surprisingly capable and enjoyable-to-use iMovie comes free with every Mac sold since at least 2011. iMovie only offers two video tracks, but does good job with chroma-keying, and its Trailers feature makes it easy to produce slick, Hollywood-style productions.

Software as a Service


Funimate video editor is perfect for creating fun videos easily. It can instantly transform everyday moments into creative videos and enables automatic sharing options to different social sites. It has over 100 advanced video effects which are designed to be a perfect match for editing short videos. You can even make short video loops which can be entertaining.
If you want rich video editing functions like cropping, snipping and splicing, then Viddy isn't for you. But for adding interesting filters and soundtracks, Viddy can be a good option. With a slick interface, it enables you "beautify" your video in a just few clicks. When the editing is done, you can share your videos with a one-click function to Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr and YouTube.

Support for 4K video source content has become pretty standard in video editing software, but the support varies among the products. For example, some but not all of the applications can import Sony XAVC and XAVC-S formats, which are used by Sony's popular DSLRs, mirrorless cameras, camcorders, and professional video cameras. The same holds true for the H.265 High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) standard. Most of the applications here now can import and export HEVC, though there are still a few holdouts.


There are more video editing software applications than we can fit into this roundup of the best options, which includes only software rated three stars and higher. The best known among them is probably Vegas Movie Studio, which was recently acquired by Magix from Sony. Sony's product used a very cluttered interface that more resembled high-end professional video editing software from the early days of the craft. Magix has made some progress in simplifying it and bringing it up to par with the competition, but more work is needed for it to be included here.


As it turns out, OEMs and carriers have taken matters into their own hands for video chatting. Some carriers, including Verizon, T-Mobile, and others have video calling built into every phone sold by the carrier. You can quickly and easily video chat with anyone else on the service. Thus, someone with a Galaxy S7 on T-Mobile and someone with an LG V20 on T-Mobile can video call each other directly from the dialer app like you were making a phone call. They're a bit restrictive, but they tend to work pretty well when you can actually use them. We hope these options are expanded over time.
WhatsApp is one of the most popular messaging apps ever. It's one of only a few that can boast over one billion active users. It started out as a text chat service before Facebook bought them a while ago. Since then, the app has integrated voice calling, video calling, and tons of other features. The video calling works quite well and you shouldn't have any problems using it. Not everyone trusts the app since it's run by Facebook. However, if you're just looking for something that works and is stable, this is a good app to try.
These are iPad App Reviews for iPad apps we reviewed between 07/2012 and 02/2013. The iPad app reviews include a variety of iPad app genres like: games apps, kids apps, entertainment apps, utilities apps, books apps, education apps, business apps, lifestyle apps, sports apps, family apps, social apps and other iPhone apps we checked out and reviewed during this time.
VideoShow Video Editor is one of the more popular video editing apps. It’s a simple video editor that lets you do the basic stuff like trim video, organize your clips, and add music. You’ll also find some additional features like the ability to add emoji and text to videos and a variety of video effects to make things a little more fun. It’s great for stuff like Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram, but it’s not powerful enough for bigger productions. You'll want to check out something else for that. The app is free to download and use with some additional stuff available as in-app purchases.
You may have got some high definition videos on your new iPhone 7 Plus. So do you want to edit videos on your iPhone/iPad like a pro? There are a lot of video editing apps for iPhone and you just need to choose the best iPhone video editing apps and start the iPhone video editing journey. Here we list top 10 video apps for iPhone/iPad which allow you to create movies out of your video clips and do all kinds of cool things on your iPhone.
Splice is a video editor from GoPro, the company behind some of the world’s best action cameras. You can import your photos and videos into the app, to edit them into a movie. The way the app works is simple: you just import the videos that you want to edit, and mark the important parts (Hilights, as the app calls them) of the video. You can then add music to the video, and then the app automatically clips the entire video according to the Hilights that you marked.

8 World-Class Video App Businesses

×