We still live in the days of talkies, so you want to be able to edit the audio in your digital moves as well as the images. Most of the products included here offer canned background music, and many, such as Pinnacle Studio, can even tailor the soundtrack to the exact length of your movie. All of these programs can separate audio and video tracks, and most can clean up background noise and add environmental audio effects such as concert hall reverb. A couple of the products have an auto-ducking feature, which lowers background music during dialog—a definite pro-level plus.
Talking about the editing features, it sports a multi-track timeline which means you can add more than one video and audio tracks. You can add background music or record voice-over right there in the app itself. There’s a built-in asset store where you can both free and paid music, clip graphics, fonts, stickers, transitions, and more to enhance your video. Other features include auto audio ducking, speed control for time lapse, and keyframe animation among other things. This is a feature rich video editing app for iPhone and one of the best ones you can find on the App Store.
Support for 4K video source content has become pretty standard in video editing software, but the support varies among the products. For example, some but not all of the applications can import Sony XAVC and XAVC-S formats, which are used by Sony's popular DSLRs, mirrorless cameras, camcorders, and professional video cameras. The same holds true for the H.265 High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) standard. Most of the applications here now can import and export HEVC, though there are still a few holdouts.
KMPlayer has been downloaded by more than 300 million people worldwide. It’s a free encoding player that plays almost all kind of video files. The app also supports touch gestures to skip, fast forward, or rewind your video file. It is also useful to increase or decrease the volume. There is no need for in-app purchase, and this is what tempts us to download.
VideoShow Video Editor is one of the more popular video editing apps. It’s a simple video editor that lets you do the basic stuff like trim video, organize your clips, and add music. You’ll also find some additional features like the ability to add emoji and text to videos and a variety of video effects to make things a little more fun. It’s great for stuff like Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram, but it’s not powerful enough for bigger productions. You'll want to check out something else for that. The app is free to download and use with some additional stuff available as in-app purchases.

Video doorbells don't offer local storage for recorded video, so you'll have to subscribe to a cloud service in order to view your motion- and doorbell-triggered video clips. Expect to pay anywhere from $3 per month and up for a plan that gives you access to 30 or more days of video that you can download and share. If you want to view older footage, make sure you save your clips as they will be deleted after the allotted time is up.
FilmoraGo is a video editor app by Wondershare. It's easily one of the best video editor apps. This video editor packs a whallop. You can do the basics like trim and cut, render, and that kind of stuff. It also includes the ability to play in reverse, do square videos (1:1) for Instagram, and 16:9 videos for YouTube specifically. It also has support for things like slow motion, transitions, music, overlays, and more. It's not half bad for what you get. There are in-app purchases that add to the power. However, most of the features are, in fact, free.

Magisto is a great video editor app for those who don’t have a formal video editing experience. It combines video clips, photos, music, text, video effects, and video filters to help you make an excellent video without much effort. Just select one or more video clip and a song for the soundtrack and the app will automatically create a video within a few minutes.
FilmoraGo is a video editor app by Wondershare. It's easily one of the best video editor apps. This video editor packs a whallop. You can do the basics like trim and cut, render, and that kind of stuff. It also includes the ability to play in reverse, do square videos (1:1) for Instagram, and 16:9 videos for YouTube specifically. It also has support for things like slow motion, transitions, music, overlays, and more. It's not half bad for what you get. There are in-app purchases that add to the power. However, most of the features are, in fact, free.
I've been seeing a lot of attention paid to creating title effects in the applications over the past year. Apple Final Cut Pro X has added 3D title creation, which is pretty spiffy, letting you extrude 2D titles and rotate them on three axes. Corel VideoStudio in its latest version also adds 3D Titling, though not as powerful as Apple's. PowerDirector's Title Designer offers transparency, gradient color, border, blur level, and reflection in titles; Magix has impressive title templates, complete with animations. Premiere Elements offers a nifty title effect in which your video fills the text characters, and Corel recently followed suit in VideoStudio 2019. Look for an application that lets you edit titles in WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) mode, so that you can type, format, and time it right over the video preview.
We still live in the days of talkies, so you want to be able to edit the audio in your digital moves as well as the images. Most of the products included here offer canned background music, and many, such as Pinnacle Studio, can even tailor the soundtrack to the exact length of your movie. All of these programs can separate audio and video tracks, and most can clean up background noise and add environmental audio effects such as concert hall reverb. A couple of the products have an auto-ducking feature, which lowers background music during dialog—a definite pro-level plus.
Support for 4K video source content has become pretty standard in video editing software, but the support varies among the products. For example, some but not all of the applications can import Sony XAVC and XAVC-S formats, which are used by Sony's popular DSLRs, mirrorless cameras, camcorders, and professional video cameras. The same holds true for the H.265 High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) standard. Most of the applications here now can import and export HEVC, though there are still a few holdouts.

video app


Quik is from a newer generation of video editor apps. It's halfway decent if you need something simple. The way it works is you add up to 50 photos and video clips into the app. The app then analyzes them and spits out a short video from them. Quik contains about two dozen video styles and you can re-order and customize your video before you export it. It’s not nearly as powerful as something like Adobe Premiere Clip or PowerDirector, but not everyone needs something that intense. It's free to download with no in-app purchases.
Using this app, you can create awesome green screen videos. PowerDirector also comes with tutorial videos for all of its functions. Most of its features are available in the free version, but upgrading to the full version allows you to remove watermark, ads, and even to extract videos in 1080 and 4K resolutions. It is supported in Android 4.3 and above.
Several of the products here (Adobe Premiere Elements is a notable exception) still support 3D video editing if that's your thing, though the this has been replaced by 360-degree VR footage like that shot by the Samsung Gear 360 as the current home-theater fad. As is often the case, our Editors' Choice, CyberLink PowerDirector was the first product in this group to offer support for this new kind of video media.
Quik is from a newer generation of video editor apps. It's halfway decent if you need something simple. The way it works is you add up to 50 photos and video clips into the app. The app then analyzes them and spits out a short video from them. Quik contains about two dozen video styles and you can re-order and customize your video before you export it. It’s not nearly as powerful as something like Adobe Premiere Clip or PowerDirector, but not everyone needs something that intense. It's free to download with no in-app purchases.
The app also comes with lots of sound effects and supports voice over layering. There’s also support for stickers, emojis, filters, effects, transitions, color correction, and more. One important feature of Inshot Video Editor is that it also allows you to rotate and flip videos which comes in really handy in certain specific scenarios. Overall, this is a really good video editing app. The only flaw of the app that I find annoying is that the free version runs ads. If you can handle that, you are going to enjoy using this one.

8-in-One Video Solution


As with all software services, pricing and packages are an important consideration when it comes to video conferencing. The prices quoted and the product descriptions below are typically for the lowest level of service per user per month. (For more pricing information, click through to the individual reviews.) All but one of the video conferencing services I tested offers free trials (most for 30 days) and many don't require a credit card on file, which means you don't have to worry about being charged automatically when the trial ends.
We still live in the days of talkies, so you want to be able to edit the audio in your digital moves as well as the images. Most of the products included here offer canned background music, and many, such as Pinnacle Studio, can even tailor the soundtrack to the exact length of your movie. All of these programs can separate audio and video tracks, and most can clean up background noise and add environmental audio effects such as concert hall reverb. A couple of the products have an auto-ducking feature, which lowers background music during dialog—a definite pro-level plus.

Kik is a popular video chat app. It's actually a text chat app with video chat features. The app features single or group chats, support for most types of media sharing (GIFs, video, images, etc), and some extra stuff like stickers. Kik is a popular chat service for mobile gamers. For instance, I've used it for Clash of Clans in the past. It also doesn't rely on your phone number. You just need a standard user name to use much like Skype and unlike WhatsApp or Google Duo. It's colorful, so those who want something a little more serious may need to keep looking. Otherwise, Kik is a perfectly acceptable app for both video and text chats.

All-in-One Video Solution


Skype is one of the most popular video chat apps for any platform. It has native apps on most platforms, including PC, which makes it one of the best cross-platform options out there. The Android app certainly isn't perfect, but it can usually get the job done. You can do group video calls with up to 25 people. The app also features a free text chat, Microsoft and Facebook account integration, and you can even call regular cell phones for a nominal fee. The app still needs work, but it's definitely better than it was a year or two ago. The cross-platform support is top notch as well.

Magisto is a very simple video editor app. With this app, you don’t get any features such as adding text overlays, tilt shifts, etc to your video. However, the charm of this app lies in its simplicity. Within the app, you can import your photos and videos, and choose a theme for the video. There are a number of themes available, such as dance, among many others. Once you’ve done that, you get the option to add music to the video, as well as options to decide how long you want the video to be.

paul ponnadurai

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